Michigan's Economy

"We are no longer 50 out of 50. We have an opportunity to get to No. 1", said Governor Snyder recently. He's talking about the economy of Michigan, and he feels as though that "we are back." While Michigan is 10/50 for population, 1st in engineers per capita, seventh in manufacturing output, third in durable goods manufacturing, and sixth in patents issued to residents, the state was recently ranked only 28th in the best states for business. Most concerning is that it was ranked 47 out of 50 for Labor Supply, meaning that the quality of labor in Michigan is at the lowest of quality.

"Making New Jobs" May Not be the Answer... What is?

"The number of Americans claiming new unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest level since 1973, signaling continued health in the labor market", says the Wall Street Journal. Unemployment is at an all time low, yet income disparity remains at a growing all time high. One can easily see that more money is moving to the rich. Based off of this statistic one can infer that maybe infrastructure spending to create more jobs is not the answer. We need higher quality jobs with higher pay, or more equitable payment systems.

Rent Eating Into Incomes

"As rent prices continue to rise, a new study shows Millennials are paying about 45% of their total income toward rent, and pay out close to $100,000 toward rent before they turn 30", an article on Housingwire explains. What is really concerning is that if the trend continues, "Generation Z is expected to have to pay around $102,000 in rent during their 20s." Clearly, people are affected by a lack of incomes and ability to even find jobs. We have examined this through multiple discussions in regards to income inequality. However, this is yet another issue that residents must face.

Did you vote in the 2016 presidential election?

(Other)
0% (0 votes)
I was not of age at the time of the election
0% (0 votes)
I cannot vote in the US
0% (0 votes)
No
0% (0 votes)
Yes
100% (7 votes)
Total votes: 7

My proposal has to do with voting and Gerrymandering. According to Pew, Millenial voter turnout increased in the 2016 Presidential election. However, many of us (age 17-22) do no quite fit-in with the "Millenial" definition and more represent the habits and behaviors of Generation Z.

I'm curious to see how many caucus members voted in the last presidential election and their experiences and opinions about the process.

 

U of M and Detroit Poverty

The University of Michigan recently announced that they are providing up to $500,000 to Detroit to fight poverty. The aim of this is to decrease income inequality, and create economic mobility. "This is a unique opportunity for the university to partner with the city of Detroit to find new and innovative ways to boost mobility and reduce poverty, seeking to bring value to Detroiters while also building knowledge about what works in fighting poverty that can be exported to other cities." The listed priorities of the partnership include...

Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum

“Economic historians generally agree that the infamous Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930, which sharply raised tariffs on more than twenty thousand goods produced overseas and exported to the United States, didn’t cause the Great Depression, but it did accentuate it. As other countries retaliated with import duties of their own, the volume of world trade spiralled down. At the start of 1930, world trade had been about $2.7 billion. By the beginning of 1932, it was less than $1.3 billion.

Platt Road Project, 20 Year Plan, and Library Lot deal

At Wednesday's town hall meeting with Sara Saylor from the Ginsburg Center, we discussed the transition from assessing community needs to establishing laws in Michigan. Some things I learned about were the prevalent income inequality, lack of affordable housing, and food insecurity that exists in Ann Arbor. With Ann Arbor being ranked one of the most educated cities in the United States, it may come as a surprise that the city has a high level of economic segregation and low social mobility.

Changing Income Taxes

Recently, there was new bill proposed by Senator Jeff Stone of California to eliminate state income tax for the poor and middle class. Married residents making under $200,000 and individuals making under $100,000 would not have to pay any income tax. This accounts for nearly 90% of California’s population. The bill would also cause wealthy part-time residents to pay income taxes for the time they live in California.

Questions to think about:

Do you think this is a fair?

How do you think the residents of California would react if this passed?

Michigan's Economy

"We are no longer 50 out of 50. We have an opportunity to get to No. 1", said Governor Snyder recently. He's talking about the economy of Michigan, and he feels as though that "we are back." While Michigan is 10/50 for population, 1st in engineers per capita, seventh in manufacturing output, third in durable goods manufacturing, and sixth in patents issued to residents, the state was recently ranked only 28th in the best states for business. Most concerning is that it was ranked 47 out of 50 for Labor Supply, meaning that the quality of labor in Michigan is at the lowest of quality.

"Making New Jobs" May Not be the Answer... What is?

"The number of Americans claiming new unemployment benefits fell last week to the lowest level since 1973, signaling continued health in the labor market", says the Wall Street Journal. Unemployment is at an all time low, yet income disparity remains at a growing all time high. One can easily see that more money is moving to the rich. Based off of this statistic one can infer that maybe infrastructure spending to create more jobs is not the answer. We need higher quality jobs with higher pay, or more equitable payment systems.

Rent Eating Into Incomes

"As rent prices continue to rise, a new study shows Millennials are paying about 45% of their total income toward rent, and pay out close to $100,000 toward rent before they turn 30", an article on Housingwire explains. What is really concerning is that if the trend continues, "Generation Z is expected to have to pay around $102,000 in rent during their 20s." Clearly, people are affected by a lack of incomes and ability to even find jobs. We have examined this through multiple discussions in regards to income inequality. However, this is yet another issue that residents must face.

U of M and Detroit Poverty

The University of Michigan recently announced that they are providing up to $500,000 to Detroit to fight poverty. The aim of this is to decrease income inequality, and create economic mobility. "This is a unique opportunity for the university to partner with the city of Detroit to find new and innovative ways to boost mobility and reduce poverty, seeking to bring value to Detroiters while also building knowledge about what works in fighting poverty that can be exported to other cities." The listed priorities of the partnership include...

Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum

“Economic historians generally agree that the infamous Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930, which sharply raised tariffs on more than twenty thousand goods produced overseas and exported to the United States, didn’t cause the Great Depression, but it did accentuate it. As other countries retaliated with import duties of their own, the volume of world trade spiralled down. At the start of 1930, world trade had been about $2.7 billion. By the beginning of 1932, it was less than $1.3 billion.

Platt Road Project, 20 Year Plan, and Library Lot deal

At Wednesday's town hall meeting with Sara Saylor from the Ginsburg Center, we discussed the transition from assessing community needs to establishing laws in Michigan. Some things I learned about were the prevalent income inequality, lack of affordable housing, and food insecurity that exists in Ann Arbor. With Ann Arbor being ranked one of the most educated cities in the United States, it may come as a surprise that the city has a high level of economic segregation and low social mobility.

Changing Income Taxes

Recently, there was new bill proposed by Senator Jeff Stone of California to eliminate state income tax for the poor and middle class. Married residents making under $200,000 and individuals making under $100,000 would not have to pay any income tax. This accounts for nearly 90% of California’s population. The bill would also cause wealthy part-time residents to pay income taxes for the time they live in California.

Questions to think about:

Do you think this is a fair?

How do you think the residents of California would react if this passed?

Should we have a Universal Basic Income?

In 2017 the idea of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) began to go mainstream in the U.S. That is "Basic income is a periodic cash payment unconditionally delivered to all on an individual basis, without means test or work requirement."

Here is a great intro to the idea: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kl39KHS07Xc 

No questions have been added to this group.
No documents have been added to this group.

Did you vote in the 2016 presidential election?

Yes
100% (7 votes)
No
0% (0 votes)
I cannot vote in the US
0% (0 votes)
I was not of age at the time of the election
0% (0 votes)
(Other)
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 7

My proposal has to do with voting and Gerrymandering. According to Pew, Millenial voter turnout increased in the 2016 Presidential election. However, many of us (age 17-22) do no quite fit-in with the "Millenial" definition and more represent the habits and behaviors of Generation Z.

I'm curious to see how many caucus members voted in the last presidential election and their experiences and opinions about the process.

 

Recent activity in this group

Tue, 4/10/2018 - 11:30am
Tue, 4/10/2018 - 9:33am
Tue, 4/10/2018 - 8:50am
Tue, 4/10/2018 - 5:25am