Not just providing affordable solutions, but also healthy ones

Child and youth hunger is a significant issue across the entire state of Michigan. Every year hundreds of thousands of kids are not fed enough. Schools have remedied this issue with lunch stipends, and plans which provide low-cost food, or food for free.

The "Good Food Access Report" noted the 59% of Michigan residents have limited access to "good food". By this they mean food which is healthy, affordable, and was produced/cultivated in an environmental way.

School Hunger

Context

Reference to a current Michigan bill or law that relates in some way to your proposal:

Healthy, Hungry-Free Kids Act of 2010

Why this proposal will make a difference in the lives of students of all ages across Michigan, or a significant subgroup (by age, background, economic status, and/or region, etc.) of students in Michigan:

#KFBGoOrange- Does Social Media Work?

I recently found an article about West Michigan community members who are teaming up with Kids’ Food Basket for “Go Orange Day.” According to the article every March, Kids’ Food Basket promotes the color orange because it is the national color for childhood hunger awareness. The event is being promoted through social media and the hash tag #KFBGoOrange, and participants are asked to share photos. In addition to social media, they have partnered with local restaurants participating in “Dine out for Go Orange” in the week leading up to the Go Orange Day.

Fighting Hunger in Michigan's School System

The Michigan public school system provides eligible students with free and reduced price meal options. Eligibility is based off of federal income poverty guidelines and are stated by household size (https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/03/23/2016-06463/child-nutrition-programs-income-eligibility-guidelines). While this can be a great resource for students and families in need, non-school hours and breaks prove to be an issue. 

Youth Homelessness

Link to your media artifact(s) giving background on the issue:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1WohBuvO3RymvlZy7d1WGSBX8E8pvbtJO0f6eqYWlNoY

 




 

Poverty and Hunger Cycles in Detroit: Exploring the Root of the Problem

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, the outgoing director of the Detroit Public Health Department recently gave a TEDx talk at U of M discussing the links between poverty and public health. His talk was part of a larger series and can be viewed through this link http://tedxuofm.com/livestream starting at about 2:29:00. El-Sayed's talk focuses on the differential experience of health and access to certain resources in Detroit and how geography and income both play such a significant role in this discrepancy.

Not just providing affordable solutions, but also healthy ones

Child and youth hunger is a significant issue across the entire state of Michigan. Every year hundreds of thousands of kids are not fed enough. Schools have remedied this issue with lunch stipends, and plans which provide low-cost food, or food for free.

The "Good Food Access Report" noted the 59% of Michigan residents have limited access to "good food". By this they mean food which is healthy, affordable, and was produced/cultivated in an environmental way.

#KFBGoOrange- Does Social Media Work?

I recently found an article about West Michigan community members who are teaming up with Kids’ Food Basket for “Go Orange Day.” According to the article every March, Kids’ Food Basket promotes the color orange because it is the national color for childhood hunger awareness. The event is being promoted through social media and the hash tag #KFBGoOrange, and participants are asked to share photos. In addition to social media, they have partnered with local restaurants participating in “Dine out for Go Orange” in the week leading up to the Go Orange Day.

Fighting Hunger in Michigan's School System

The Michigan public school system provides eligible students with free and reduced price meal options. Eligibility is based off of federal income poverty guidelines and are stated by household size (https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/03/23/2016-06463/child-nutrition-programs-income-eligibility-guidelines). While this can be a great resource for students and families in need, non-school hours and breaks prove to be an issue. 

Poverty and Hunger Cycles in Detroit: Exploring the Root of the Problem

Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, the outgoing director of the Detroit Public Health Department recently gave a TEDx talk at U of M discussing the links between poverty and public health. His talk was part of a larger series and can be viewed through this link http://tedxuofm.com/livestream starting at about 2:29:00. El-Sayed's talk focuses on the differential experience of health and access to certain resources in Detroit and how geography and income both play such a significant role in this discrepancy.

Is Urban Farming Helpful and Sustainable?

Urban farming is the practice of cultivating, processing, and distributing food in or around a village, town, or city. This type of farming should not be confused with a community garden though. Food produced from an urban farm can be sold at restaurants or at a farmers market. This type of farming has become a means to increase access to locally grown food, and is a way of reintroducing the public to many aspects of food and nutrition that they may not incorporate normally into their daily lives.

Agricultural Surplus

The Michigan Agricultural Surplus System (MASS) is a partnership between the Food Bank Council of Michigan and the Michigan Department of Agriculture. Together, these two organizations aim to redistribute Grade B produce from famers and distribute it to those in need through various participating food banks.

Grade B produce is produce that is unmarketable due to their physical appearance. The produce is still nutritious and safe to eat, but goes to waste simply because grocery stores only want the most appealing looking foods on their shelves. 

After School Programs- Hunger Relief

There are many programs throughout the country that aim to help child suffering from hunger through after school programs. One in five Michigan children is food insecure, and a lack of consistent, nutritious food limits cognitive development and leaves kids unable to concentrate in school. Additionally, without healthy food, children can demonstrate behavioral issues like irritability, aggression, and anxiety.

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School Hunger

Context

Reference to a current Michigan bill or law that relates in some way to your proposal:

Healthy, Hungry-Free Kids Act of 2010

Why this proposal will make a difference in the lives of students of all ages across Michigan, or a significant subgroup (by age, background, economic status, and/or region, etc.) of students in Michigan:

Youth Homelessness

Link to your media artifact(s) giving background on the issue:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1WohBuvO3RymvlZy7d1WGSBX8E8pvbtJO0f6eqYWlNoY

 




 

Urban Farming as a solution to youth hunger - Joseph Ziegelman and Katie Winn

Context

In 1981 Michigan the RTFA (Right to Farm Act). This act allocated certain land to be protected for farming purposes. However, this did not specify whether or not Urban Farms would also be protected. Since Urban Farming involves only gardening and crops, few townships actually regulate such agriculture. Therefore, we felt we could expand and make clear the sections of the RTFA to include Urban Farming in the city of Detroit.

 

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